Reviews of Books Damaging to the LGBT Community

Frequently, LGBT Christians and/or their families desperately seek ways to understand sexual orientation and/or gender identity that may appear to be in conflict with their faith. You may be one of those people.

Perhaps you’ve been sent a book by a well-meaning family member, or seen or heard a speaker that seems to have the answers you are looking for. Well, I’ve read many of such books so that you may not need to read or buy them. Typically, my reviews are long and detailed. I challenge and evaluate the contents on any or several levels which apply to the book: historical, social, medical, psychological, political, and biblical.

In researching for my own book, Walking the Bridgeless CanyonI read and watched hundreds of book, papers, articles and documentaries. It’s allowed me to be able to evaluate other books. Also, since 2001, I’ve been been heavily engaged in the LGBT community in friendships, attending inclusive churches, and conferences.

Part of my Christian activism includes reviewing books that are damaging to the LGBT community. As non-inclusive books are published, or come to my attention, I add reviews to this list, which for the most part, are hosted on Amazon as well.

If there is a book you would like me to consider reviewing, please send a note to Kathy@canyonwalkerconnections.com

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In “Speaking of Homosexuality – Discussing the Issues with Kindness & Clarity” Speaking of Homosexuality by Joe Dallas(Baker Books, 2016), author Joe Dallas presents the Traditional and Revisionist (his usage of terminology) perspectives and a look at “the pros and cons in the gay debate” with suggested responses.

Dallas defines the Traditional view as seeing that “homosexual acts, like numerous other sexual behaviors, fall short of God’s intention and are therefore sins” and “it (homosexuality) is an unnatural condition God never intended, but which exists as one of the many manifestations of fallen human nature.” As to the Revisionist view, he writes, it “advocates revising our view of Scripture or of morality in general to condone homosexuality.” (p 17)

Dallas wrote the book “to help the reader better understand arguments in favor of homosexuality, and to equip (the reader) to meet those arguments with responses that are accurate, biblical, and compassionate.” (p 17) In the latter section of the book, Dallas presents his interpretations of the verses most typically used to condemn homosexuality. Scripture is key to the discussion, he writes, because “we’re commissioned to learn the truth, live that truth, and express that truth and the Heart (God’s) it reflects, to whoever will hear.” (p 25) Full review on Amazon

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“When Homosexuality Hits Home –What to do When a Loved One Says, ‘I’m Gay’” Joe Dallas When Homosexuality Hits Homeby Joe Dallas (Harvest House Publishers, 2015) is an expanded edition of the initial 2004 book.

In the book, Dallas gives advice on how parents with gay children, the spouse with a gay partner, or other family members are to respond in “grace and truth (with) the enormous challenge to be honest and loving” (p 17) when “This person I love is a homosexual.” (p 19)

Dallas is a visible speaker and contributor on the topic of “human sexuality from a biblical perspective.” By his own admission, he says: “(I) never considered myself to be completely homosexual.” (p 8) He grew up in Southern California, and by 8th grade was having sex with boys and girls and using drugs. By the age of 15 in 1971, he was also having sex with adult men. (Source: online interviews with JD) Full review on Amazon
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The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert : An English Professor’s Journey into Christian Faith by Rosario Butterfield

Over the past several years, “The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert” (Crown & Covenant, 2104) by Rosaria C. Butterfield has been The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convery, Rosaria Butterfieldpositioned by evangelicals and religious conservative as one of the go-to books for conversion from homosexuality to heterosexuality.

Among conservative Christians, Secret Thoughts is most frequently positioned as a book of sexual identity and the conversion story of an academic radical feminist lesbian to a conservative straight pastor’s wife. Butterfield writes: “My story is not representative or diagnostic. If people are using my testimony in this way, they should stop (and I will tell them that, if you need me to.)” (p 171)

Yet, ironically, this book is used in precisely this manner. It has been suggested and given to countless Christian lesbian friends with the hope of encouraging them to stop being lesbians through a similar conversion experience.

I find the popularity and use of this book to be quite confusing. Even Butterfield writes about those who might read her book: “I figured that about twenty people in my small, unknown denomination would purchase it, in the same way the people might buy a church cookbook.” (p 176) I agree. (Continued HERE on Amazon)

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You Don’t Have to Be Gay (Pacific Publishing House, 1987) by Jeff Konrad

I read this book because a mother with a gay son told me she recently read the book and found value in it. SheYou Don't Have to be Gaychallenged me to read it as an authoritative personal account of a former gay man.

So, I read it.

Oh my goodness! How could a book written in 1987 (a full thirty years ago) be valued as an accurate depiction of a current experience of gay people, in particular those who identify or are seeking to have a spiritual walk? An incredible amount of information about human sexuality has been discovered over the past thirty years. It had only been fifteen years at the writing of this book that the designation of mental illness had been lifted off homosexuality.

The reparative therapy industry had just recently cropped up within the Christian church starting in the late 1970s with Exodus International. The conservative church had somewhat ignored homosexuality until Anita Bryant came on the scene in 1978. Several conservative groups, primarily based within the televangelist community, saw monetary value in pointing to the threat of “moral decay” caused by others combined with the Christian imperative to rescuing America from other peoples’ sin and stave off the imminent return of Christ. [CONTINUED HERE ON AMAZON]
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Compassion without Compromise by Ron CitlauCompassion without Compromise (Bethany House, 2014) by Adam Barr and Ron Citlau — A Book Review

“Compassion without Compromise” (Bethany House, 2014) co-authored by Reformed Church in America (RCA) pastors, Adam Barr and Ron Citlau, is subtitled “How the Gospel Frees Us to Love Our Gay Friends Without Losing the Truth.”

I read books written from this point of view regularly. As is with other authors in the same genre, the authors of this book assume the foundational basis on which they’ve constructed the whole of their guidance and beliefs to be correct, biblical truths. The aim of the book is to be a “compassionate, uncompromising witness in a culture that celebrates what the Bible censors.”

Throughout the book, the authors attempt to present objections to their “biblical truth,” or traditional view by contrasting it with a point of view called “revisionist.” To them, I would be considered one such revisionist. Contrary to the view that “many revisionist interpreters have a personal stake in this issue,” I am straight, a mother of two adult heterosexual children, and have been an evangelical Christian for thirty-five years. Continued HERE.

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Hope for the Same-Sex Attracted by Ron CitlauHope for the Same-Sex Attracted by Ron Citlau — A Book Review

“Hope for the Same-Sex Attracted” (Bethany House, 2017) by Ron Citlau is subtitled “Biblical direction for friends, family members and those struggling with homosexuality” with the intended market of “pastors, church leaders, parents of a  same-sex struggler, and Christians who want to work very hard to make their church a place where same-sex strugglers can flourish.” (p 16)

Before reading and reviewing this book, I completed “Compassion without Compromise,” a book co-authored by Citlau and suggested by him as “a more in-depth discussion on what the Scriptures say about homosexuality and biblical ethics.” Once familiar with Citlau’s theology, I was better equipped to read and review this book. [I posted a review of that book as well.]

Citlau’s says there are three obstacles that stand in the way of God giving His gifts to “same-sex strugglers” (a term that Citlau uses to gross excess. The term often appears over six times on a single page.) The author lists the three obstacles: identifying as a gay Christian, gay marriage, and the spiritual friendship movement. Continued HERE on Amazon. 

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God & Sexuality by Janet Boynes — A Book Review

Settle in, this will be one of my epic reviews.Janet Boynes Ministries

I am concerned about the content, the message, and the impact of Janet Boynes’ latest book “God & Sexuality.” I will go section by section in my evaluation of content.

The foreword endorsement to the book is written by Dr. Michael L. Brown. Without further comment to Brown’s work here, several book reviews of his works written by me are linked under my Amazon commenter account.

In the Preface, Boynes tells her readers that she is in a season of ministry to “hundreds of people who have struggled or are struggling with homosexuality and want to leave the lifestyle once and for all.” She also writes that she “lived the lifestyle for 14 years” and has been “called out of a homosexual lifestyle.” In the two opening paragraphs, Boynes uses the word “lifestyle” four times.

Boynes never defines what she means by “lifestyle.” (continued here)

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Landon Schott Gay Awareness

Gay Awareness by Landon Schott — A Book Review

Texas-based, traveling evangelist Landon Schott is certainly not unique in his strongly anti-gay theological and ideological beliefs. His lack of academic integrity and immature reasoning skills alone should render him inconsequential in the conversation about faith as it intersects sexual orientation. Yet, he can’t be dismissed because his target market is teens and young adults, in particular, the most vulnerable of them, gay youth.

Schott’s new book Gay Awareness: Discovering the Heart of God and the Mind of Christ on Sexuality “ . . . is primarily for the individual who struggles with same sex attraction, but truly loves God with all his or her heart. . . . This book is for the Christ-follower who desire to know what the Bible truly says about homosexuality.” (p. 17) Schott adds, “I want you (the reader) to feel respected and safe.” (p. 18) While I do trust Schott believes his motives will match outcome, tragically, he seems appallingly unaware of the consequences of his message. CONTINUED HERE

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Messy Grace by Caleb Kaltenbach — A Book Review

Caleb Kaltenbach’s Messy Grace: How a Pastor with Gay Parents Learned to Love without Sacrificing Conviction(2015, WaterBrook Press) had been recommended to me as a compassion treatment of the intersection of faith and sexual orientation.

Kaltenbach’s book is one of the recent book offerings in latest genre of Christian authors extending what they perceive as a more merciful perspective on the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. (continued HERE)

 

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Alan Chambers My ExodusAlan Chambers’ My Exodus — A Book Review–Alan Chambers’ newly released book—My Exodus: From Fear to Grace—written with his wife, Leslie, is self described as “ . . . simply our story. It’s a story about our parents, our childhood, our coming of age, our marriage, and our journey out of a system of beliefs driven by fear and rules,” (p. 15).

Chambers has played a significant role in the faith and sexual orientation landscape. From 2001 until 2013, he was the president of Exodus International, a Christian umbrella ministry overseeing religious-based gay conversion to heterosexuality. Exodus’ primary target groups were: Christians who identified as lesbian or gay, their families, and paraministries or churches with outreach programs to gay people and their families — all who were seeking a way “out of homosexuality” towards heterosexuality, or as a compromise, celibacy. Beginning in the early 1980s, Exodus member ministries adhered to an ideology which combined long discarded psychological theories about reparative therapy with a spiritual component. CONTINUED HERE

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Outlasting the Gay Revolution by Michael BrownMichael Brown’s “Outlasting the Gay Revolution” Continues His Non-Academic Anti-Gay Rantings

Michael Brown called the last public review I posted on one of his books Brown a “revision” not a review. I expect this book review will receive a similar response.

I’m taking the time to post what I realize is a lengthy review: to be a strong counterbalance to Brown’s ideology, to alert those who may be tempted to give this book to LGBT persons as a “loving” action, and to expose Brown’s poor academic research.

Before addressing Michael Brown’s “Outlasting the Gay Revolution,” I need to lay some groundwork as to how I approach all books I would term as Christian and anti-gay and anti-trans. CONTINUED HERE

 

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If an author refuses to address the subject of the intersection of faith with sexual orientation and gender identity with academic integrity including acknowledging: the cultural shifts in the status of women, the progression of understanding and input from experts in human sexuality, the merger of conservative politics and religion since the late 1970s with its destructive impact, each significantly influencing the ability to take an honest look at biblical translations, then why should we listen to you?Kevin DeYoung’s Book — Another Author Lacking Academic Integrity But Telling Us What God “Really Says” Anyway––Kevin DeYoung’s What Does the Bible Really Teach About Homosexuality? offers yet another utterly maddening viewpoint of “God’s truth” about gay people.

I’ve read the bulk of such books written over the past few decades, beginning with the first “gays are out to destroy America” book written for the evangelical community by Tim LaHaye in 1978: “The Unhappy Gays.”

Once the new genre started, it triggered an onslaught. Next came the religious-political booksThe Unhappy Gays by Tim Lahaye from authors like Falwell and Dannemeyer in the 80s. In the 90s, came a deluge of we-are-no-longer-gay books by Chambers, Dallas, Jernigan, et al. I have slogged through most of them, including the “truths” built upon assumptions tome by the contemptuous anti-gay theologian Gagnon. I’ve endured the lunacy of Lively and even tried to find a pastoral heart in Hubbard and McDowell’s writings. To my great disappointment, they too failed. I’ve stomached Brown’s fringe venom poorly cloaked as compassion, and been left nonplussed by the shallow philosophical-political arguments of Anderson and Satinover. CONTINUED HERE

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A New Kind of Apologist by Sean McDowell — A Book Review  

I wanted to be encouraged by the chapters on gay and transgender issues in Sean McDowell’s A New Kind of Apologist (Harvest House, 2016) in which McDowell acted in the role as editor over 27 authors with “a new approach to apologetics.” (Apologetics is reasoned arguments used to establish and defend the Christian faith.)

I have personally met and spoken with McDowell and two of the contributors to his book whose chapters I will be discussing here: Alan Shlemon, author of the “Transgender: Truth and Compassion” chapter, and Glenn Stanton, author of the “Being Authentically Christian on the LGBT Issue” chapter.

I had hoped each of these three men would indeed reject the myth-filled rhetoric on LGBT issues inside the evangelical bubble and instead address their respective topics well, as McDowell tells the readers the “new apologist” must. Along with being humble, relational, and living out their advice to readers, McDowell informs us, the new apologist must also be “studious.”

[ORIGINAL POSTED ON AMAZON]

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yan Anderson Truth Overruled

Truth Overruled : The Future of Marriage and Religious Freedom by Ryan T. Anderson — A Book Review uses only arguments “based in philosophy, jurisprudence, political science and social science” to investigate “what marriage is, why marriage matters for public policy, and what the consequences are of redefining marriage.”

Attempting to keep the debate on marriage equality going with social and religious conservatives, Anderson highlights “truths” he imagines SCOTUS trampled in extending marriage equality to roughly 10 million American.

Anderson, in constructing these “truths,” ignores the social history of marriage, elevates procreative complementarity as a condition of marriage, and discounts all major professional medical and psychological associations’ statements on the natural variations of sexual orientation and gender identity.

And on Amazon.

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Same-Sex Marriage: A Thoughtful Approach to God’s Design for Marriage (A Thoughtful Response Series) by  Sean McDowell

This is the latest entry in the “we love the gay people but don’t think they are deserving of civil rights and this is how we express our love” category. Here is what I understand the basic premise to be — God invented marriage, so Christians own it and no one has the right to redefine it. WHOA! It might behoove the authors to read a good historical account of marriage such as the one by Stephanie Coontz, “Marriage, a History: How Love Conquered Marriage.”
Before I write this summary, for the record. I AM an evangelical Christian, straight, 2 adult kids (26 and 28) and neither gay. No gay family members. I was in the isolation of the evangelical world until I met a hiking buddy on a trail in 2001. I know both sides of this issue WELL.
INTRO — comment of the unparalleled speed at which this issue has hit — well, the gays only came out of closet of shame imposed on them cultural and by the medical community in 1973 and the first request for marriage was in 1970. Rev. Troy Perry of MCC started petitioning RIGHT AWAY. I think 45 years of trying to get a civil right is quite a long struggle. (Continue HERE)

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Understanding Sexual Identity: A Resource for Youth Ministry by Mark YarhouseAn ineffective theory about gay people, wrapped in kinder packaging, and carefully tied a prettier bow of pseudo-compassion is still an ineffective theory.

Understanding Sexual Identity: A Resource for Youth Ministry (October, 2013, Zondervan) by Mark Yarhouse, Professor of Psychology at Regent University (Founded by Fundamentalist Pat Robertson as Christian Network Broadcast University in 1978), was written as a guide to help Christian pastors and leaders counsel gay youth.

Yarhouse suggests that youth leaders, when ministering to “sexual minorities” use a three-tiered approach in conversation. He has created distinctions between the three stages of sexual identity:
* Same-sex attraction — a descriptive way in which people can discuss their experience. The youth may say, “I am attracted to X person.”
* Sexual orientation — a persistent sexual attraction or orientation towards the opposite sex, same sex, or both. The youth may say, “I am only attracted to the opposite sex.”
* Gay identity — a “sociocultural” identity that people use to communicate their sexual attractions. The youth may say, “I am gay.”

Leaders are encouraged to slow the conversation down with a youth who wants to talk about this issue. A compassionate exchange is strongly encouraged. Extra points for this one, but if Mom and Dad are not getting the same message out in Big People Church, subtract points. (Continued HERE.)

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A Queer Thing Happened to America by Michael Brown

The book has fifteen chapters. I have written comments on about one third of the pages in my book. Addressing all of my concerns and insights are not practical in a blog post. The approach I will take it to state, as best I can, the point of each chapter followed by my opinion of that section.
THE STEALTH AGENDA
Thirty pages of documentation of the various sources of the “gay agenda”. Mr. Brown builds his case for the development and existence of the “gay agenda”. The Stonewall Riots in 1969 was the beginning of the Gay Liberation Movement. I agree. This was followed by the publishing of “Refugees from Amerika: Gay Manifesto” by Carl Whitman which Mr. Whitman says “never became dogma” and no one I know has ever read it.
Next, there is the 1972 Gay Rights Platform presented by 200 GLBT attendees to the Democratic National Convention. I love the internet; you can Google anything. In all the searches on this 1972 event, the overwhelming majority of references to it were by conservative group telling the tale over and over as if it were the seed of some major power ploy. One account even said there were 200 organizations represented. In 1972? Wow. Actually, the truth is five delegates presented their wish list at midnight and virtually no one was there to hear them and there were 200 GLBT people at the convention, not organizations as several of the references stated.
“After the Ball: How America Will Conquer its Fears and Hatred of Gays in the 1990’s” is referred to dozens of times in AQTHTA. It has a six-fold plan for the “gay revolution”. Sounds terrifying. Again, a Google search has all the conservatives referring to the plan and not one GLBT organization. If it is part of the “gay agenda”, shouldn’t some gay group be using it or alluding to it?
The statement by Dr. Brown that stunned me was : “Ironically, when it comes to denying the existence of a gay agenda, there is immense unity in the gay community. Why? It is because the denial of that agenda is part of the agenda (although for some, it might be a sincere, heartfelt denial.” (pg 43) What? (Continued HERE.)

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Washed and Waiting by Wesley Hill
I think the market for this book will be parents/friends/pastors of GLBT Christians wanting them to change and seeing this book as a hopeful incentive. Hate is too strong a word, but “really disliked’ would be accurate. People who are GLBT are not “broken” and that world is repeated over and over.
I find this a sad, depressing book and not one I would ever recommend. Of course Zondervan would publish this book; it complies with the Evangelical church lines. I have worked for over five years with the GLBT community, especially the Christian part of it.
The study work on the translations if shabby and there is too much emphasis on literature and books for examples. Go talk to real people. Mr. Hill may be comfortable with this life choice, but the underlying “I am broken” message will take it’s toll. (Continue HERE.)

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Nothing Gay About Being Gay by Tyeesha Holt

I am an avid reader, and it is without doubt that this was the worst book I have read in at least a decade, perhaps more.

Holt came into my view when a friend in the SF Bay Area disappointedly told me that Acts Full Gospel Church, Oakland was bringing her in to speak. I decided to read her book.

Overall, this a a story of a bad family life, bad decision and more bad decisions. Holt tell readers from the onset “The devil through the erosion of the traditional family has a plan to deceive and destroy a generation. This is the ultimate goal of the homosexual agenda.” What does that even mean? Does it mean that gay people in cahoots with the devil are out to destroy people? Who wrote this agenda and WHERE on earth is this written down?

I am a straight evangelical Christian with two adult straight children. Not only does Holt’s life NOT mirror the lives of thousands of LGBT people and couples I know, I have never heard one person say they are intent on destroying traditional families and people — they simple want to coexist with equal dignity in society and in the church. Continues HERE

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Gender, Lies and Suicide by Walt Heyer

There is not doubt that author Walt Heyer is angry and dissatisfied with his choice to undergo sex reassignment surgery 30 years ago. He feels he was not properly counseled and was actually suffering childhood trauma that altered his view of his gender, and then subsequent adulthood depression. Do I think this is possible? Yes. I do think a person can be damaged from childhood trauma and have a skewed view of gender
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It is estimated that there are between 32K and 40K male-to-female transwomen in the US currently. Heyer presents his story as a warning and somewhat typical. When I read his book, I immediately likened it to a person who has had a traumatic childhood, entered a life of abuses, and twisted his narrative of abuse, and often destructive behavior with sexual orientation “blaming” a homosexual orientation with childhood dysfunction. In fact, Heyer does PRECISELY that several times in the book:

“There is no proof that trangenders are born.How a child acts out their gender roles will vary depending on the parent or parents, siblings and anyone else who has an active role spending time with the child from a very young age.”  (Continued HERE.)

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Understanding Gender Confusion: A Faith Based Perspective by Denise Shick — A Book Review

Denise Shick Understanding Gender Confusion When I read information about sexual orientation and gender identity issues, the context of time is an ESSENTIAL piece of the communication. This element is sadly left out of Shick’s writing. I had to do the math — she is about 46. When she was 9, her father tranistioned. That would have been around 1977. This IS a key piece of information conveniently omitted.

VERY LITTLE was know about gender identity at that time. Doctors were still regularly snipping and cutting intersex babies in attempts to make the body match the gender. Shockingly, that practice would go fairly unregulated without best practices standards until 2005.

The culture in which Shick’s father came out was extremely naive by our standards. Cross-dressers and transgender people were regularly mistaken in common language. There would have been very little, if any, readily available resources for him to try to understand what was going on. Hey, maybe he was a cross-dresser and NOT transgender?
And on Amazon.

 

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A Strong Delusion by Joe Dallas  Dallas may have been able to charm and deceive people (including himself) with this tripe in 1996, but now — with the testimony of gay Christians (without the air quotes), their visibility and the excellent refutation of his arrogant statements — this delusion that he and others built is, THANK GOD, crumbling around him. Exodus closed only to be replaced by Restored Hope, a retread of the same old, same old.

Each chapter has a series of proposed questions that a gay person or supporter might ask, followed by his oh-so-wise answers. He presents those on the other side of his dogma as uneducated and not as holy as he is. The arrogance repulsed me. There are PLENTY of people who can sit on a stage with him and deconstruct his myths and distortions. I would GLADLY do it at a mutual agreement.

I then went to video to watch his live presentations. Even then, he appears to speak down to others. If you are gay and Christian or love someone who is, I would suggest you start with “Torn” by Justin Lee for lighter reading or ” Bible, Gender, Sexuality” by James Brownson for a more scholarly work.  Skip Dallas ALL TOGETHER. (Continue HERE.)

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Means Of Grace by Kent Paris
I read most of Paris’s book in the lobby over two sessions while he was reading his presentation to a group in a sanctuary. I had heard him read the same presentation four times at that point. In his Q & A time, he used a group of numbers referenced at the back of this book. WHen I saw the numbers, I was shocked that anyone would EVER present them as “science” or an authentic view of “homosexual activities”. He presents them as directly from “gay publications themselves”.
THIS it the real story. The real story is often less fantastic than the imagined one. The number used in the “Homosexual Behaviors” are derived from a 1977 survey published in “Blueboy” and sent out to the subscription list. 500,000 were sent out, 5,400 were returned.
There is a phenomenon called “participation bias” which means people who have something unusual to share -do. Those who choose NOT to share tend to be more middle of the road. With a 1% return rate of subscribers to a magazine which is the equivalent of Playboy or Penthouse, to a survey where there is a participation bias and TAKEN OVER THIRTY FIVE YEARS ago just as gays and lesbians were coming out of the recesses of society —-THIS is to be the picture of how gay men participate in sex NOW??? (Continued HERE.)

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Additional minor fiction and other anti-gay books:

Maybe He’s Not Gay by Linda Harvey
First– the book format itself:
The cover — no gay boy would be caught dead in those sneakers, but a few lesbians might like them — know your target audience
The typesetting made each chapter an eye test, the sections spacings would be unacceptable in a high school homework assignment
Poorly written and constructed — lots of “oh, i’ll tell you that later”s
Could have been reduced to about a dozen pages

Next — Ms. Harvey would require only one 101 level class in human sexuality to undermine her entire premise for the book. It has all been said before about her book, her logic, her obsession. When one bases an entire work on a lie, you cannot expect very much. Homosexuality is a normal variation of human sexuality. This has been settled for over 40 years. (Continue HERE.)

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Let’s Get the Gay Thing Straight by Gary Mortara

This may be one of the worst (right down there in the gutter with Linda Harvey’s book) on LGBT issues.

I am glad I did not pay for it — a friend sent it to me.

There are just too many problems with this book. First, the editing is atrocious. Hillary and Eda should be ashamed of their work. Grammar, punctuation and a GLUT of !!!!!!!!!, and more !!!!!. (Continued HERE)

 

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Ryan’s Father by June Foster
Ms. Foster, your book is fantasy — this is NOT the story of LGBT Christians. This is the story you want for them. From the witness I have seen in the lives of thousands over the past 14 years, the story God has for them is more honest and filled with fruit and life.

On P.29, you wrote, “The Word made i clear that God considered the behavior indecent and perverse.” There are many Christians with an increasing number, me included, who do not see the Bible as clear on this issue at all. In fact, we understand the Scriptures to mean the excesses of lust leading to forbidden same-sex behavior in ancient cultures.

The main character, Ryan hopes and prays for “the desires” for a woman will come. The author leads us to believe that Ryan is “damaged” in his sexual desires as as result of not having a father (his birth is the result of a one-night stand his drunken mother had with an unknown man). (Continued HERE)

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Daring to Tell My Story — My Journey to Sanity and Safety in Jesus by Tom Osborne

This is the story of a person overcoming a severely addictive personality. By his own admission on page 109, author Tom Osborne admits this of himself. The story could have been written by a heterosexual or homosexual person; in this case, the object of attraction is the same sex.

A timeline associated with the many stages of trying to deal with the addiction may have been helpful. Christian counselors in the 1970s to mid 1990s would have approached the issue far differently than today. We know a great deal more about the issue now.

Osborne’s family life certainly seems to have lead to his addictive personality. Though he never mentions the term, overly enmeshed mothers who lack sexual connection with their husbands, predictably sexualize their sons. Good counseling early on may have save Osborne from poor choices. (Continued HERE.)
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Amen Corner by Gwen Richardson

All the tired myths are repeated in this book.
If you listen to or read conservative onlines, you have heard all of this.

This is so much to say about this book . The author may be competing with Michael Brown in who can better misrepresent a population. Brown wins on page count, Richardson wins on conciseness of drivel. (Continued HERE)

 

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